How to Prepare for your Arborist Visit

Phil Pruning Oak Trees

Phil Pruning Oak Trees

Some people wonder what they should do before their arborist team arrives. It may not be every day that you have an educated tree guy or gal show up, so here’s a few small things that your arborist will truly appreciate having done before they arrive.

1. Pet droppings: Please pick up your pet’s droppings. Sometimes, with a wave of our magical chainsaws, we can have the brush go straight from the tree to the chipper without touching the ground, but most of the time, someone is walking through your yard. It not only gets on our boots, but our hands too! When we climb, our hands typically end up where our feet were. Now, don’t feel bad if your cutie-pie puppy planted a land mine for us just as you leave for work, we understand, most of us have fluff balls of fun at home, too. So thank you for helping us keep our boots, hands, and lunches free of digested dog food.

2. Items sitting underneath the tree: Please remove any items in the area around the tree. Birdbaths, garden gnomes, and solar lights love to hide in places we can’t see. Now, avoiding the lawn chair isn’t going to cause us to drop a limb in your kitchen, but it does make our day easier. Not having to move things out of the way before beautifying or dismantling your tree helps us get to our fluffy fur balls and rug rats sooner. Moving kid’s toys is also extremely helpful to our climbers. Some of the grounds crew can get…um…distracted with toys laying around. Please don’t hurt yourself trying to move the heavy 100% steel patio set by yourself because the heavy lifter in the house decided that the Packer game was more important than your back (even though it may or may not be). We get paid to move trees from your yard to our truck, but we can move a thing or two to keep you happy and healthy.

3. Open gates and clear pathways: Please open the gates to your yard prior to your arborists arriving. We like climbing things made of wood like jungle gyms and trees, but fences are kinda low on the list. Also, if you happen to have your great grandma’s precious hasta that you don’t want damaged, it wouldn’t be the worst idea to pop it out of the ground and put it in a pot for the day; especially if it could be in a drag path. We do our best to keep your plants and yard in good shape. Sometimes, the brush isn’t very compliant in leaving your yard and may put up a fight worse than a kid told “No” in a candy store. If you have any special concerns with anything on your property, please let us or our sales representatives know.

4. Plan one company at a time: I like to think we are friendly people and don’t bite too hard, but tree work is hazardous and takes up a lot of space. The less people we have walking around, the better. So if the lawn cutter guy and the landscapers could show up before or after our team, I am sure we would all be okay with it. Now, back to the digested doggy food topic. Pesticides, just like dog waste, gets everywhere. We all like being healthy and not having herbicide in our lunches, so please eradicate the weeds after we leave. Don’t worry, we won’t judge, your lawn is almost guaranteed to look better than the lawn at my house.

5. Let us know about any concerns or hidden objects in your yard: We don’t like breaking your stuff. We really don’t. It involves paperwork and informing the weird boss guy. So if you have any hidden sprinkler systems, jars of money, or explosives just under your turf, please let us know. Also, if you have any other concerns or questions, feel free to talk to us: we get paid by the hour. Just get our attention from a safe distance if we are working. We like keeping our customers and their things intact.

Thanks for reading this, or at least pretending to read it.

-Phil, the childish arborist who gets yelled at for playing with kid’s toys.

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Winter Protection of Trees and Shrubs

This time of year, many people wonder how they should be preparing their yards for winter. We suggest attending to new plantings, preparing evergreens, be aware of winter burn, and protect any trees, shrubs, or plants that might be subject to animal feasting.

Spreading Mulch

Melissa Spreading Mulch

New plantings are most susceptible to winter desiccation because they don’t have established root systems. Continue to water these new plantings through fall. Watering can be done until frost and is strongly encouraged for new plantings and evergreens. People often overlook the fact that trees and shrubs still transpire (although slowly) through winter. Roots still grow in unfrozen soil, so it is important to tend to them until frost takes over.

 

Evergreens have foliage to support and therefore are also very susceptible to winter burn. Damage is not directly caused by how cold it gets, but rather how quickly the cold comes. Rapid 40 degree swings from day to night can cause the most damage. Photosynthesis and respiration still take place in winter on sunny days through needles and bark, which requires soil moisture. When there is little snow cover, the soil freezes to deeper levels, limiting moisture uptake. Deep snow is more beneficial because it insulates the roots and provides moisture when it melts. Mulch helps insulate the roots as well. We recommend three inches of mulch around trees, but take care to keep the mulch away from the trunk itself. Little snow and excessive dry wind make for the harshest of winters for these trees.

 

Winter burn is the result of plants drying out over winter, but there are other types of damage. Growth that has not hardened off can easily be damaged by early frosts. Buds can be injured during late frosts, causing tattered looking leaves in the spring and early summer. De-icing salt can damage plants along sidewalks and roads. They can dry aerial parts of the plant in the winter, but cause continuing problems later. The residual salt in the soil concentrates when the water table drops during mid-summer droughts. If you know of an area in your yard that routinely gets a good amount of salt indirectly applied to it, a little extra watering in the spring will help. You may also want to consider applying some garden gypsum to help break it up.

 

As animals run out of easily accessible food, they may turn to your trees and shrubs. It is best to fence off areas to deter wildlife from browsing. Also, deep snowbanks can create the perfect cover for rodents to girdle stems. If you can help it, don’t pile up shoveled snow in one area.

 

We never really know what winter will have in store for us. These tips should give you some ideas of what you can do to prepare your yard for whatever might be coming.

 

~Melissa Veloon

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Choosing a Tree Care Company

Matt Climbing Clean UpChoosing any contractor to work on your property is something everyone has experienced. We check credentials for contractors like plumbers, builders, and electricians, but what about tree care contractors? Does anyone think about what to look for in a company that deals with trees? I mean, it’s just trimming a tree, right? Or in some cases, it’s only cutting down a tree, right?

When it comes to needing tree work, most folks use the approach they take for other large projects such as roofing, landscaping, or even putting in new windows. They have a general idea of what they want completed and they get a few estimates. Now, if someone were to adopt any of the above adages such as “It’s just trimming a tree” or “It’s just cutting down a tree,” price might be the only deciding factor. It is no secret that tree work can be very costly, but do those folks really know what they are getting for their money? Is there any way to know if it’s truly a good deal? Here are a few important factors to consider.

 

The Estimate

In order to distinguish a good deal from a bad deal, you must give each estimate a fair shake. Find out exactly what work will be performed so that you can compare. What kind of proposal do you have in front of you? Is it even written down? If one of your estimates for “trimming” a maple tree in the front yard is for $200, and it’s given verbally and agreed upon via handshake, it may not sound like a bad quote. Now compare that to written quote for the same tree, with a detailed outline of what work will be performed. It lists that the company will remove all deadwood 2″ in diameter and larger and prune away from the home to a distance of 8 feet for $800. The quote is either emailed or mailed, and you must sign and return it. How can the two quotes be compared to each other? The first quote might accomplish the same as the second, more expensive quote, but how do you know that? It doesn’t state what will be done. They cannot, for any homeowner’s purposes, be compared. There are a lot of branches in a tree. Which branches need to go, and which branches can stay? How can you trust that the estimate will yield your expected results? You can start by looking into the company’s education.

Education

Education is something that, although lacking in our industry, is getting better. Knowing how to properly prune a tree and what it means for the overall health and vigor of the tree is something that CAN be taught. I often mention credentials, and while certifications aren’t always a fool-proof method of weeding out a true tree care professional, it is a step in the right direction. One good thing to look for is someone who has a full-time, certified arborist on staff. I mention full time because there are companies that may say they have a certified arborist on staff, but only refer to them and pay a yearly or monthly consulting fee. So their certified arborist doesn’t actively work for them; he/she is there to consult, or sign papers when certain contracts require a certified arborist.

A certified arborist is someone who, I hate to say it, passed a test. The test consists of anything and everything tree related: tree biology, biomechanics, climbing techniques, rigging techniques, tree identification, among many other things. As a person who has proven that they know a little bit about the industry, they should have a good idea on how best to care for your trees.  

Another great thing to look for is some sort of degree in Urban Forestry. There are many great programs for bachelor’s and associate’s degrees offered throughout the country. Folks pursuing this degree have a passion for bettering their knowledge-base to become great at what they do.

Professionalism

Professionalism refers to who works for the company, how they carry themselves, and the image they portray.

A few things that can determine professionalism in a tree contractor are things like: personal protective equipment (hard hats, chaps), clean vehicles, how well the job done, how clean the area is after the job is complete, availability for communication, and returned phone calls.

When a company invests in proper PPE (personal protective equipment), it really shows that they value their employees. Valued employees tend to appreciate their jobs, which is reflected in the type of work they do. They show pride in what they do and they constantly seek improvement. This, in turn, gives the client a better value when their services are performed. The same can be said about having clean work vehicles and cleaning up after a job. If a vehicle is maintained well and clean, and a job site is kept neat and tidy, chances are that the employees are taking pride in their job, which often reflects in their work performance as well.

Perhaps one of the most professional things a tree company can do is be available to talk and return phone calls. Tree care is a service industry. Tree companies cater to a customer’s needs, and there is no way they can do that if no one answers the phone, or if they don’t call back when they say they will, if at all. If through the process of obtaining an estimate, the company has either not returned phone calls, or failed to answer the phone at all, it may be a warning sign.

When choosing a tree care company, be sure to consider the thoroughness of the estimate, as well as the company’s education and professionalism. When all three of these elements come together, you are sure to receive quality service.  

~Jonathan Bantle

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Women in the Tree Care Industry

Melissa Treating for Apple Scab

Melissa treating for Apple Scab at the Selner Tree Shrub Care office

There is a certain stigma associated with tree workers: strong, bearded, rough and tumble, and in general, not dainty.  A lot of our clients are surprised to find that when the crew arrives on site, that we usually have at least one woman on the crew.  Folks usually associate tree work with men, and why wouldn’t they? Trees are heavy. Believe me, I’ve tenderized my back lifting many pieces of trees, and I’m no tiny person.  Selner Tree & Shrub Care, LLC employs three full time female arborists.  They are full time employees, and are some of our most valuable employees on staff.

Let’s spearhead the obvious reason most folks are shocked to find a female on the crew: strength.  Forgive me for the generalization, but it’s no secret that women just aren’t built the same as men.  Although there are a few anomalies, women aren’t usually as strong as men when it comes to lifting heavy things.  These ‘things’ in the tree care industry include: their own body weight, heavy pieces of wood, tree branches, and even certain pieces of rigging gear.

The beauty of working for an advanced tree care company in the 21st century is the fact that many of the heavy things that need lifting daily, are often lifted using equipment that is built specifically to do so.  It’s for this reason that there is no need to be built like an ox to be a valuable employee in the tree care industry.  A careful and dainty touch is often required more so than brute force.  When we are removing a tree over a glass sunroom surrounded by landscape beds full of tender perennials, I’ll opt for a softer hand over a bull in a china shop any day. 

Many of our clients are often shocked to hear that most of our female employees also climb.  You heard that right, girls! You can be a professional tree climber too!  I still remember the first time I watched a woman climb a tree professionally.  It was about five years ago at an international tree climbing championship.  I’m not going to lie (honesty is the best policy), that I was skeptical about how the female competitors would stack up to their male counterparts.  After the first female competitor ascended and started through the work climb, I was shocked.  She was absolutely crushing it.  She made many of the male climbers I knew look like silly fish flopping around aimlessly in a tree.  This same feeling was reassured again just a couple weeks ago when I competed in my first tree climbing competition.  I always thought I was an above average tree climber, but the few women that were at that same competition made me look like a toddler just learning to walk.

As a man in the tree care industry, I have no doubt that women can be just as, if not more, valuable than most men doing the same exact job.   

 

~Jonathan Bantle

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Ashwaubenon Street Tree Pruning Contract

As of Monday, January 30th 2017, the crews have finished pruning 183 village-owned street trees. Go ahead, applaud. I’ll wait.

This is the second pruning project we have been a part of for the Village of Ashwaubenon. The first project was completed in June of 2016. The pruning of village-owned trees is just as important as pruning privately owned trees (if not more so).. Have you ever witnessed a tree branch taking a ride on top of a garbage truck? This is one of the main reasons why we prune these street trees. Although the garbage truck did effectively “prune” the limb off the tree, this is not ideal for the tree or the truck. Street trees need to be pruned properly to provide clearance for larger vehicles on the street side and to provide ample head room on the residential side. While our arborists are up in the trees, they take a little extra time to remove any larger deadwood as well as any branches that may be crossing or rubbing on one another. This is better for the overall health of the tree, and also allows the arborist to move around the entire canopy. This also lets the arborist see any parts of the tree that are (or could become) threats for any people on the street, sidewalk, or lawn areas below.

Along with the obvious vehicles driving down the city streets, our crews had to work around many obstacles. Some of the things we encountered on a daily basis were: mailboxes, our own chipper and truck, street lights, and signs. All of these things need to have ample clearance so they can be most useful to village residents. One of the largest obstacles of this year’s project was quite simply: weather. With the April showers in January, we did lose a lot of snow, but rain can turn a lichen-covered Norway Maple or Green Ash into a very slippery situation. It’s for this reason that we had to completely cancel pruning the street trees for four of the eleven total days we had originally scheduled to complete the job.

With all the weather-related setbacks, it seemed that completing the project would be a little tougher than we imagined. However, the crew seemed to look at the time-crunch as a sort of challenge and, with a little extra work and a couple of late days, we made up the extra four days without trouble. Looking back on the project and all that we’ve accomplished, it’s hard to ignore everything that was done to keep us on track despite the challenges and setbacks we encountered. I’d like to thank every one of the crew members that had a hand in getting the project completed to Selner Tree & Shrub Care LLC.’s standards. Thank you Casey, Matt, Phil, Aree, and Skye for putting in the extra effort to make sure everything was completed on time in a professional manner regardless of what the weather had in store for us.

All the trees for Part 1 of the contract are now completed and won’t need much attention for the next 8-10 years or so. Yup, you read that correctly. I wrote “Part 1.” Which might make you wonder, “Does this mean there is a Part 2?” That’s exactly what it means. For the second part of the pruning contract, we have 299 trees to prune, inspect, and clean up for the Village of Ashwaubenon. If you happen to see our crews out working on the street trees in 2017, feel free to wave and say “Hi!”

 

~Jonathan Bantle

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Pruning Trees in the Winter

One of the most common questions we hear is “What do you do in the winter?” Simply put: we zip up our coats and do the same work we do in the spring, summer, and fall.

This response often leads people to wonder how we know what to prune in the winter since the trees have no leaves. It does take a little eye-training, but after a day or two, it becomes quite easy to distinguish dead from living branches even from the ground. Some of the obvious signs are mushrooms covering the bark, all small twigs missing from the branch, or bark missing from the branch. If the limb hasn’t been dead long enough to show any of the above signs, we can look at the bark or buds of the branch. The buds of a dead branch will either be very small and dried up, or non-existent, and the bark may have a different color or look shriveled up compared to nearby living tissue.

Most people assume that we don’t prune in the winter. However, there are certain species of trees that must be pruned in the dead of winter to help prevent disease; especially fungal disease. Oaks and Elms are great examples of this. Both species suffer from fungal diseases that will outright kill a tree over one or two growing seasons. These trees are more susceptible to diseases because insects can carry fungal spores and introduce them to a healthy tree with any damage or pruning cut. By pruning in the dormant season, the trees are less susceptible to disease through insect vector.

Pruning trees in the winter may look insane and very hard to do, but sometimes it is the only way to keep the health of the tree as our top priority.

~ Jonathan Bantle

Tree Pruning

Tree Pruning – Image Courtesy Lowell Franklin

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Be a Hero: Plant a Native Species

“We are failing our ecosystem.” We hear this statement all of the time. We hear about things like Global Climate Destabilization, plastic islands in the ocean, and mass species extinction. We are told to recycle, drive less, and use less water. So, we try. Recycling is becoming second nature; the bins are everywhere. We bike and walk more and we use water-efficient showerheads and toilets, but what if I told you there was something just as important as all of those things that can help us make a difference? Most of us have a yard with lawn and plants. What if I told you that what you planted in your yard could help our world recover?  Our once flourishing and productive ecosystems are being taken over by lawn and agricultural fields. Most of what we plant in our yards tends to be exotic species that have not evolved to function in our eco system. What is worse, many are becoming wildly invasive, taking over what little free forest we have left. These exotic species do not feed wildlife such as birds, butterflies, and bees (five species of which have just been put on the endangered species list). How are they to survive when we take more and more of their home and turn it into grass? We often use vast amounts of pesticides and fertilizers on our lawn. How much time per week do you actually spend on it? We mow our lawn, expelling carbon dioxide, and use mass quantities of water to make it grow, just to mow it all over again.

We can help put a stop to all of this! Take some time and put a little research into what is native to your area. Stop planting things such as buckthorn, barberry, and Japanese Honeysuckle. Instead, plant viburnums, American hazelnut, or witch-hazel. By planting native species of trees, shrubs, and flowers we can help save our environment. Native plants, which are adapted to our eco system, require watering only in times of severe drought, which saves you time and money. They feed wildlife, which preserves necessary species and promotes biodiversity. Finally, incorporating more native plants creates a beautiful landscape free of maintenance and helps limit excessive mowing and use of chemicals.

  • AreéAnna DeZort

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Safety Culture

We as arborist have a very risky job. We work at towering heights; trusting an unrated anchor while handling sharp objects. We reduce the risk of injury by following industry standards. These standards are not followed by many in our industry; which causes many injuries and sometimes, death.


We take safety to heart. We love what we do, but it’s very important that we go home to our loved ones at the end of the day. You will see us wearing some key personal protective equipment like helmets, safety glasses, and chainsaw chaps while cutting on the ground. When we leave the ground, we use rated gear and select limbs in the tree that can easily support double the climber’s weight. In the event a climber in the tree loses their footing or cuts themselves, an aerial rescue may be needed. This past August, we invited an arborist to help us train in the event an aerial rescue would be needed. Each arborist practiced rescuing a dummy that was in trouble for several different reasons. When an issue arose, we came up with a solution to correct it. The training showed us our strengths and weaknesses. 
We hope we never need to utilize these skills in real life, but we are comforted to know that we are equipped to handle dangerous situations if needed.

  • Casey Selner

 

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Benefits of Mulching

Trees are cannibals.  Plain and simple.  They eat themselves, and they have adapted a pretty good system in doing so.  Think about where leaves and branches fall to when they come off a tree.  Those branches and leaves are, in a forest setting, being recycled by either the parent tree, or another nearby tree. 

In an urban setting, that all goes out the window.  Leaves are raked, branches hauled to the curb for a municipality to chip up and dispose of.  So why not try to give your trees a little piece of the paradise like their counterparts in the forest?  Mulching does just that.  It adds some of that lost organic matter that is hauled away in large trucks.  Not only is mulch a great food for trees as it breaks down, but it helps to amend the soil, adding organic matter which improves water-holding capacity, reduces compaction, and increases beneficial microbes in the soil. 

-Jonathan R. Bantle

Mulch around a tree

Mulch around a tree

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An Introduction


Casey Selner PictureAs arborists, we are called to look at trees and shrubs of both good and bad health. We do our best to bring good news. My name is Casey Selner. I am the Chief Arborist and Board Certified Master Arborist here at Selner Tree & Shrub Care. We plan to use this blog as a collection of things we come across on a day to day basis. The blog posts will come from me and my team of amazing arborists; all of whom bring a unique set of skills. Each of us has a different experience every day and we want to share those insights with you.

Over the next few months, we hope to cover a wide range of topics including information about girdling roots, how to identify improper planting and what can be done to fix it, provide updates on Emerald Ash Borer, and explanations of the personal protective equipment our arborists wear and why. I will even feature fun facts about my mobile office, or my Nissan Cube, that you may have seen around Green Bay or Appleton. We are very excited to share these topics with you. Feel free to join in on our conversations!

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